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BB

Bonbon B.

AP CS

1 day, 5 hours ago

What is gcd(nj, nj+1)? (I.e., look at adjacent Fibonaci numbers). How many steps does the algorithm take? Do fibonacci pairs behave like your randonmly chosen pairs in the previous section? What about gcd(nj,nj+2)? Is there a pattern here? Try gcd (nj,nj+3).

MK

Moeen K.

AP CS

2 days, 9 hours ago

Draw use case diagrams of the following case study: During requirements modelling for the new system, you met with the farm hands and owners of several farms who were in discussion with Henry’s Organics and intending to join as part of an expanded company, all coordinated in a direct delivery model to customers. Things were moving very quickly, and positively. You conducted a series of interviews, reviewed planting and harvesting records, observed business operations, analysed the payment processes, and studied a sample of sales, billing and account settlement transactions. Your objective was to develop a list of system requirements for the proposed system that would unify the farms at a business level. You found the following: A typical farm has capacity to provide produce to 175-250 customers, with two customer types: “Regular” and “Standard”. Regular customers seek a relatively “regular” mix of vegetables each week trusting the farms discretion to determine what vegetables to provide for them for the week if need be, while “standard” customers place orders most weeks, but are much more varied in what they may order for that week. If there is going to be a short fall in availability of vegetable produce, then first priority is given to meeting the orders placed by regular customers over standard customers. All customers are able to provide their order using the existing “phone-in” system, but there is a preference for customers to order using an online web form. The on-line form “stores” each customer previous weeks’ order and so presents a “defaulted selection” with the aim of speeding up order placement for most customers, though there is capacity to change the selections through a check-box interface. All orders are defaulted to be delivered to home premises, though there is capacity for a customer to pick up their order from their “local” farm should they choose to do so. The home address thus needs to be known, along with any special instructions regarding hazards on premises, such as dogs being present. Each farm will thus need to establish a delivery service, and it is envisioned that there could be some overlap with respect to which farm may fulfil and deliver for customers who fall near a “boundary” between two or more farms. All customers have credit privileges. Credit purchases for vegetables are currently recorded on a paper credit slip, which is signed by the customer, and to be invoiced at the end of the month. The electronic form of ordering vegetables is to maintain such a credit process, though customers may choose to pay as each order is placed, or as produce is delivered. At the end of each day, cash/EFTPOS sales and credit charge amounts are entered into the NLA (for Henry’s Organics Accounts) accounting software, which runs on a local computer at each farm. Daily cash takings are deposited in a local bank in the corporate NLA Account. The NLA program produces a daily activity report with a listing of all sales transactions. At the end of the month, each local farm owner uses NLA to transmit an accounts receivable summary to the head office at Henry’s farm, where member statements are prepared and mailed either by email or physical mail, depending upon the customers selected preference. Members may physically mail their payments to Henry’s farm, where the payment is applied to the member account, or use an on-line credit card payment system, which is being promoted by the farm as a preferred method of payments. The NLA program stores basic customer information but does not include information about customer vegetable preferences…although such information would, in principle, be available by reviewing a customers’ purchasing history. Currently the NLA program produces one local report (the daily activity report) and three reports that are prepared at the head office location (Henry’s farm): a monthly customer sales report, an exception report for inactive customers and late payers, and a quarterly profit-and-loss report that shows a breakdown of revenue and costs for each separate line of vegetables. During the interviews you received several “wish list” comments from farm staff and indeed, owners of other farms, who were now becoming more interested in becoming involved commercially with Henry and Betty. For example, many farmers want more analytical features so they can spot trends in demand, especially those tied to season, and so prepare by planting more of certain crops. Farm hands are frustrated when there is an over-yield of some crops which are thus left to rot and would prefer a means by which temporary discounts could be provided to help clear such stock, or better still, to have these used to complete short falls experienced at other farms that are to be part of the business network. The farm owners also want better information about the profitability of specific vegetables, instead of bottom-line totals. Several farmers want to offer various social networking options, including email communications and Facebook groups, to promote/advertise (discount/sale) farm produce. Henry is also in support of this digital marketing and management is keen to have this capability in their system. Several farmers want better ways to handle information about part-time farm hands, and several farm hands have requested flexibility in being able to work at different farms.

MK

Moeen K.

AP CS

2 days, 9 hours ago

Draw use case diagrams of the following case study: During requirements modelling for the new system, you met with the farm hands and owners of several farms who were in discussion with Henry’s Organics and intending to join as part of an expanded company, all coordinated in a direct delivery model to customers. Things were moving very quickly, and positively. You conducted a series of interviews, reviewed planting and harvesting records, observed business operations, analysed the payment processes, and studied a sample of sales, billing and account settlement transactions. Your objective was to develop a list of system requirements for the proposed system that would unify the farms at a business level. You found the following: A typical farm has capacity to provide produce to 175-250 customers, with two customer types: “Regular” and “Standard”. Regular customers seek a relatively “regular” mix of vegetables each week trusting the farms discretion to determine what vegetables to provide for them for the week if need be, while “standard” customers place orders most weeks, but are much more varied in what they may order for that week. If there is going to be a short fall in availability of vegetable produce, then first priority is given to meeting the orders placed by regular customers over standard customers. All customers are able to provide their order using the existing “phone-in” system, but there is a preference for customers to order using an online web form. The on-line form “stores” each customer previous weeks’ order and so presents a “defaulted selection” with the aim of speeding up order placement for most customers, though there is capacity to change the selections through a check-box interface. All orders are defaulted to be delivered to home premises, though there is capacity for a customer to pick up their order from their “local” farm should they choose to do so. The home address thus needs to be known, along with any special instructions regarding hazards on premises, such as dogs being present. Each farm will thus need to establish a delivery service, and it is envisioned that there could be some overlap with respect to which farm may fulfil and deliver for customers who fall near a “boundary” between two or more farms. All customers have credit privileges. Credit purchases for vegetables are currently recorded on a paper credit slip, which is signed by the customer, and to be invoiced at the end of the month. The electronic form of ordering vegetables is to maintain such a credit process, though customers may choose to pay as each order is placed, or as produce is delivered. At the end of each day, cash/EFTPOS sales and credit charge amounts are entered into the NLA (for Henry’s Organics Accounts) accounting software, which runs on a local computer at each farm. Daily cash takings are deposited in a local bank in the corporate NLA Account. The NLA program produces a daily activity report with a listing of all sales transactions. At the end of the month, each local farm owner uses NLA to transmit an accounts receivable summary to the head office at Henry’s farm, where member statements are prepared and mailed either by email or physical mail, depending upon the customers selected preference. Members may physically mail their payments to Henry’s farm, where the payment is applied to the member account, or use an on-line credit card payment system, which is being promoted by the farm as a preferred method of payments. The NLA program stores basic customer information but does not include information about customer vegetable preferences…although such information would, in principle, be available by reviewing a customers’ purchasing history. Currently the NLA program produces one local report (the daily activity report) and three reports that are prepared at the head office location (Henry’s farm): a monthly customer sales report, an exception report for inactive customers and late payers, and a quarterly profit-and-loss report that shows a breakdown of revenue and costs for each separate line of vegetables. During the interviews you received several “wish list” comments from farm staff and indeed, owners of other farms, who were now becoming more interested in becoming involved commercially with Henry and Betty. For example, many farmers want more analytical features so they can spot trends in demand, especially those tied to season, and so prepare by planting more of certain crops. Farm hands are frustrated when there is an over-yield of some crops which are thus left to rot and would prefer a means by which temporary discounts could be provided to help clear such stock, or better still, to have these used to complete short falls experienced at other farms that are to be part of the business network. The farm owners also want better information about the profitability of specific vegetables, instead of bottom-line totals. Several farmers want to offer various social networking options, including email communications and Facebook groups, to promote/advertise (discount/sale) farm produce. Henry is also in support of this digital marketing and management is keen to have this capability in their system. Several farmers want better ways to handle information about part-time farm hands, and several farm hands have requested flexibility in being able to work at different farms.

MK

Moeen K.

AP CS

2 days, 9 hours ago

Draw use case diagrams of the following case study: During requirements modelling for the new system, you met with the farm hands and owners of several farms who were in discussion with Henry’s Organics and intending to join as part of an expanded company, all coordinated in a direct delivery model to customers. Things were moving very quickly, and positively. You conducted a series of interviews, reviewed planting and harvesting records, observed business operations, analysed the payment processes, and studied a sample of sales, billing and account settlement transactions. Your objective was to develop a list of system requirements for the proposed system that would unify the farms at a business level. You found the following: A typical farm has capacity to provide produce to 175-250 customers, with two customer types: “Regular” and “Standard”. Regular customers seek a relatively “regular” mix of vegetables each week trusting the farms discretion to determine what vegetables to provide for them for the week if need be, while “standard” customers place orders most weeks, but are much more varied in what they may order for that week. If there is going to be a short fall in availability of vegetable produce, then first priority is given to meeting the orders placed by regular customers over standard customers. All customers are able to provide their order using the existing “phone-in” system, but there is a preference for customers to order using an online web form. The on-line form “stores” each customer previous weeks’ order and so presents a “defaulted selection” with the aim of speeding up order placement for most customers, though there is capacity to change the selections through a check-box interface. All orders are defaulted to be delivered to home premises, though there is capacity for a customer to pick up their order from their “local” farm should they choose to do so. The home address thus needs to be known, along with any special instructions regarding hazards on premises, such as dogs being present. Each farm will thus need to establish a delivery service, and it is envisioned that there could be some overlap with respect to which farm may fulfil and deliver for customers who fall near a “boundary” between two or more farms. All customers have credit privileges. Credit purchases for vegetables are currently recorded on a paper credit slip, which is signed by the customer, and to be invoiced at the end of the month. The electronic form of ordering vegetables is to maintain such a credit process, though customers may choose to pay as each order is placed, or as produce is delivered. At the end of each day, cash/EFTPOS sales and credit charge amounts are entered into the NLA (for Henry’s Organics Accounts) accounting software, which runs on a local computer at each farm. Daily cash takings are deposited in a local bank in the corporate NLA Account. The NLA program produces a daily activity report with a listing of all sales transactions. At the end of the month, each local farm owner uses NLA to transmit an accounts receivable summary to the head office at Henry’s farm, where member statements are prepared and mailed either by email or physical mail, depending upon the customers selected preference. Members may physically mail their payments to Henry’s farm, where the payment is applied to the member account, or use an on-line credit card payment system, which is being promoted by the farm as a preferred method of payments. The NLA program stores basic customer information but does not include information about customer vegetable preferences…although such information would, in principle, be available by reviewing a customers’ purchasing history. Currently the NLA program produces one local report (the daily activity report) and three reports that are prepared at the head office location (Henry’s farm): a monthly customer sales report, an exception report for inactive customers and late payers, and a quarterly profit-and-loss report that shows a breakdown of revenue and costs for each separate line of vegetables. During the interviews you received several “wish list” comments from farm staff and indeed, owners of other farms, who were now becoming more interested in becoming involved commercially with Henry and Betty. For example, many farmers want more analytical features so they can spot trends in demand, especially those tied to season, and so prepare by planting more of certain crops. Farm hands are frustrated when there is an over-yield of some crops which are thus left to rot and would prefer a means by which temporary discounts could be provided to help clear such stock, or better still, to have these used to complete short falls experienced at other farms that are to be part of the business network. The farm owners also want better information about the profitability of specific vegetables, instead of bottom-line totals. Several farmers want to offer various social networking options, including email communications and Facebook groups, to promote/advertise (discount/sale) farm produce. Henry is also in support of this digital marketing and management is keen to have this capability in their system. Several farmers want better ways to handle information about part-time farm hands, and several farm hands have requested flexibility in being able to work at different farms.

mm

Monique M.

AP CS

3 days, 17 hours ago

QUESTION 30 A laboratory is interested in changing from a manual Calcium to an automated Calcium procedure. It the mean obtained from the manual values below significantly different from the mean of the automated values given below at the 5% probability level. Sample#; Manual Method; Automated Method (mg/dL) (mg/dL) 1; 7.4; 7.9 2; 8.1; 8.3 3; 8.5; 8.2 4; 9.0; 9.3 5; 9.8; 10.4 6; 10.6; 10.7 7; 11.5; 11.9 8; 12.3; 12.6 9; 13.9; 13.6 What is the standard deviation (be sure to use the correct standard deviation equation)? a. 3.202 b. 0.3202 c. 0.03202 d. 0.003202

JW

Jack W.

AP CS

5 days, 16 hours ago

Boolean Expressions

Lj

Li J.

AP CS

1 week, 1 day ago

We now want to develop a simple program which computes the value of the change in your pocket or purse. Complete the following program that computes the value of your coins. The user is asked to input the number of toonies ($2 coins), loonies ($1 coins), quarters ($0.25), dimes ($0.10), and nickels ($0.05). The program then outputs the number of coins and the total value of your coins.

M1

Md. 1.

AP CS

1 week, 2 days ago

Using the hardware given to the right, show the addition of two numbers in steps as it would take place. A = 18.625, B = 2.125 Show the steps in detail. Also show the contents of different registers (R1, .. R8) and control bits (C1, .. C9). It is noted that Control bits (C1, .. C9) could be either 1 or 0 and you can assign the logic levels for particular operations. You can present your answer preferably in a table. (If you wish, you can prepare your own Table to present your answer in better way) Time Step-1 operation R1 R2 .. .. C1 C2 … Comments, if any Time Step-2

Jaden J.

AP CS

2 weeks, 1 day ago

RD

R. D.

AP CS

3 weeks, 2 days ago

Write a program to determine the overhead of the getrusage and the etime calls. Other than consuming processor time, how can making a system call to check the time too often alter the application performance?

NJ

Nixo J.

AP CS

1 month ago

For the following formulas, let the universe be . Translate each of the following sentences into a formula (using quantifiers): (a) There is no largest number. (b) There is no smallest positive number. (c) Between any two distinct numbers, there is a third number not equal to either of them.

NJ

Nixo J.

AP CS

1 month ago

For the following formulas, let the universe be . Translate each of the following sentences into a formula (using quantifiers): (a) There is a smallest number. (b) Every positive number has a square root. (Do not use the square root symbol; use only multiplication.) (c) Every positive number has a positive square root. (Again, do not use the square root symbol; use only multiplication.)

BH

Brooke H.

AP CS

1 month, 1 week ago

Test

PE

Patrick E.

AP CS

None

1

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