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Absolute Value - Example 2

In mathematics, the absolute value or modulus |x| of a real number x is its numerical value without regard to its sign. The absolute value of a number may be thought of as its distance from zero along a number line; this interpretation is analogous to the distance function assigned to a real number in the real number system. For example, the absolute value of ?4 is 4, and the absolute value of 4 is 4, both without regard to sign.

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we're being asked to evaluate each of the following expressions. So let's start with number one So it says the absolute value of eight. So that means how far from zero on the number line is eight. Well, that would be eight units. So the absolute value of eight is just equal to eight now for number two, the absolute value of negative seven. While how Maney units away from zero is negative seven on the number line, while it would be seven units away. Therefore, the absolute value negative seven is equal deposit of seven now for number three, the absolute value a negative 11.2. So how maney units away from zero is negative 11.2. Well, that would be positive 11.2 units. So the absolute value of negative 11.2 is positive 11.2 and lastly, the absolute value of zero. Well, how far away from zero is zero number line? Well, you don't have to move anywhere. It's zero units away, so the absolute value of zero is just equal to zero. So no, this Whenever you take the absolute value of number, you always end up with a positive value because you're talking about distance

Syracuse University
Top Algebra Educators
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Oregon State University

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McMaster University

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