🎉 Announcing Numerade's $26M Series A, led by IDG Capital!Read how Numerade will revolutionize STEM Learning

Like

Numerade Educator

Like

Report

Rewriting Equations and Formulas - Example 3

In mathematics, rewriting is a process of converting an expression into another expression with the same value, but with a simpler form. Rewriting is usually done by applying rules that change one expression into another, usually simpler, expression. Rewriting is used in many different fields of mathematics, but is particularly important in elementary algebra, where a number of rules for rewriting expressions are taught in school. Rewriting is also an important process in computer programming, where it is often called "simplification", "unrolling", or "unwinding".

Topics

No Related Subtopics

Discussion

You must be signed in to discuss.
Top Educators
Grace H.

Numerade Educator

Anna Marie V.

Campbell University

Maria G.

Numerade Educator

Kristen K.

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

Recommended Videos

Recommended Quiz

Algebra

Create your own quiz or take a quiz that has been automatically generated based on what you have been learning. Expose yourself to new questions and test your abilities with different levels of difficulty.

Recommended Books

Video Transcript

So in this problem, we're being asked to solve the equation for the indicated variable. So we're giving this pretty popular formula y equals MX plus B, and we'll deal with this formula more in upcoming chapters. Um, it's what's called soap intercept form for the equation of the line. Well, what we want to dio is we want to solve this particular equation for X. So remember, that means we want to isolate X all by itself. So it kind of looks like we have a two step equation here. X is getting multiplied by m, and that term is getting added by B. So let's China treat this like a two step equation. So the first thing we're gonna do is we're gonna move the B to the left hand side of our equation. To do this, we're going to subtract B from both sides because B minus B is equal to zero. So these be terms. Cancel out now on the left side, the left hand side of our equation. It says Why minus b all those air not like terms, we cannot combine them. So we're simply still just left with y minus B. And it's equal to Well, we're gonna bring down the term MX. Well, now what's happening? Toe X Well, X is getting multiplied by M. So how do we get rid of that? Well, we can divide both sides of our equation by am now, we have a couple of options here. So on the left hand side, it says, Why might this be divided by, um, But because we don't know the value for any of those variables, we can't actually simplify it. So we could simply put our answer as why minus b all getting divided by M is equal to X, and this is perfectly fine. Now, the other thing you could dio, and I'll put this off to the side we have y minus B is equal to M times X. Like we said, we're going to divide both sides by m. You could have also divided each individual term by Emma's. Well, there's nothing wrong with that. But what you have is wide divided. I am which again we can't simplify. So it b y over em minus then be divided. I am which again we can't simplify so we can leave. That, as is, is equal to X. So either these expressions is perfectly fine, but most of the time you'll probably see the first one just because you don't have end up with all these separate fractions.

Syracuse University
Top Algebra Educators
Grace H.

Numerade Educator

Anna Marie V.

Campbell University

Maria G.

Numerade Educator

Kristen K.

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

Next Lectures in Algebra

02:47

03:46

01:47

01:39

02:08

01:47

02:04

01:12

01:32

01:18

01:24

02:59

01:55

02:22

03:32

02:19

07:02

01:13

01:44

01:31

02:58

03:09

03:46

01:28

03:17

04:10

03:07

01:09

01:43

01:41

03:18

03:21