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Overview of the SAT

The SAT is a standardized test widely used for college admissions in the United States. It was first introduced in 1926 by the College Board, and its name and scoring have changed several times. The SAT is currently administered by the Educational Testing Service, a private, non-profit organization in the United States, and is owned by the College Board. The SAT measures verbal reasoning, critical reading, and mathematics skills, though the College Board also includes an essay as an optional part of the exam. The SAT is typically taken by high school juniors and seniors. The College Board states that the SAT measures literacy and writing skills that are needed for academic success in college. According to a research study on the relationship between SAT scores and college grades, the examiners found a "very high" correlation of 0.80 between SAT scores and grades earned in first-year college courses.

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Okay, so today we're gonna be talking about the overview of the S A t, the sections and how to go about them. So as you guys might know, there are four sections. There's the reading, the writing, the math with no calculator and the math with calculator. So the reading section is gonna have 52 questions and it's gonna have 65 minutes, 52 questions and 65 minutes. That means is that you have a little over a minute soft each question so you can solve it in, like maybe the easier questions in a minute and the harder questions in a minute and a half. But you have to be sure to reserve five minutes at the end. Check over. Your answer is just to make sure that you've doubled everything incorrectly, things like that. So then, for the writing, the writing, you have 44 questions, but you only have 35 minutes. That means because there are more questions than the number of minutes that you're given. That means that you have to answer each question and faster than a minute. So if you can solve your questions in about 30 to 40 seconds per question. That's probably ideal. Um, this section does tend to go pretty quickly, so most people don't have an issue with completing this section, even though it does go a little bit quicker. But again, you do want to reserve at least about three minutes at the end, check over your answers. So then for the math with no calculator. So for this one, um, you have 20 questions and 25 minutes. But the thing that we have to note about both math sections is that you've got the multiple choice and you've got the free response. So for this one, there are 15 multiple choice and five free response. What that means is that for the multiple choice, you just bubble in an answer. A, B, C or D, just like the reading or the writing sections. But at the end, for the five free response they make you feel in your own answer. So, for example, if the answer is 150 you would bubble in 150 So that's the kind of tricky part at the end of the math sections on the reason why they do this is to avoid people just guessing their way through the test and that just to make sure that they actually know what they're doing and again with a section you want to reserve at least three minutes at the end to check over your answers, make sure you've doubled in everything correctly, that kind of a thing. So another thing about the math with no calculator is that a lot of people get nervous because you're not able to use your calculator and they're sort of dependent on the calculator. But it's actually not that bad because of the fact that the no calculator will only test the parts that actually require any math. Um, are gonna be difficult math questions. So, for example, they might have you add numbers of trapped things like that. I'll never have you do a difficult math operation that requires calculator, such as finding the factorial or like a combination or permutation question. They'll never have to do something like that. So it's only basic math that they're testing like arithmetic, tradition, subtraction, multiplication and efficient for this, So there's really no need to worry. So then, for the math of the calculator section you for this one. You have 38 questions and you have 55 minutes. This means again you have a little over a minute for question. Um, and for this one, there are 30 multiple choice questions on and there are eight free response. So for this one, this is one of the sections that people have a little bit more difficulty with in terms of the timing. So just try to scoop yourself along a little bit faster than you would with a note calculator section just because it just has almost double the number of questions. So you do want to be a little bit quicker with this again. Reserve about five minutes at the end to check over your answers, just to make sure that you've doubled everything incorrectly, especially for the free response section. Um, the worst thing is for you to bubble in like a 1 40 instead of a 1 50. And get that question wrong simply because you didn't bubble it incorrectly. Just be careful about that. So then, in terms of the entire test, so for the entire test, we know that other than these five and these eight freedom songs questions, they're all multiple choice. So if there are multiple choice and we know that there's no harm in guessing, then you should make sure that every single answer is filled in. You should not have left a single answer. Blink because even if you have absolutely no idea what's going on and you choose a random answer, let's just say you chose B. You still have a 25% chance of getting that question correctly because there are four Question four answer choices. A, B, C and D. So let's just say you had eight questions that you had absolutely no clue what you were doing on. But if you guessed on those, then realistically, because you have a 25% chance of getting them correctly just by guessing you will have gotten to questions correct just by guessing. So getting two questions out of the eight correct is better than getting no questions right out of the eight. So it's definitely better to guess, um, rather than to not have anything there also, Um, because we know that if you were to skip and then skip the question, you might end up leaving it blank, meaning that you might shift all of your answers up, which is another reason why you should definitely fill in every single answer. Because, for instance, if it was 21 22 23 24 you said be for 21 you had no clue what was for 22 and then for 23 you decided your answer should be D, you might actually end up putting your D here instead of your d here, making all your answers shifted up. And there's absolutely nothing worse than having a situation like that where you have to go back and erase everything and figure out where you went wrong because you filled in your last answer and there's still one space that's the absolute worst, So just be very careful of that. So then the last thing I want to leave you with in terms of the entire test is that it is a long test. Be sure that you are keeping up your stamina. It is an endurance test. The test is almost about four hours long, including the breaks. They will give you a longer break in between the kind of halfway through. In between the writing and the math sections. But ultimately, you just want to make sure that you're pacing yourself. That you if you really do think, think you're burning out and you need to break. Maybe during the last section take like a 12th break. I know that seems kind of short, but maybe just glance away for a little bit and then come back to your test and then resolve it because there's nothing worse than you know, having yourself burnout midway through the test and feeling like you just can't go on. Well, there's only good news is four hours can be long. Well, once you do it, you're done for a little bit and maybe you'll have to retake it. But ultimately you're done for the day. So just be sure to get through the entire test. Mhm.

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Top SAT Educators
Emma C.

Wellesley College

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University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

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