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Problem 61 Hard Difficulty

A person swimming underwater on a bright day and looking up at the surface will see a bright circle surrounded by relative darkness as in Figure P22.61a, a phenomenon known as Snell’s window. Use the concept of total internal reflection and the illustration in Figure P22.61b to show that $\theta=97.2^{\circ}$ for the cone containing Snell’s window.

Answer

$\text { Using the total internal reflection concept } \theta=97.2^{\circ}$

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Video Transcript

you know, we have a following situation live travels on the surface of the water here. On that, it travels inside. And then from here we have reflection. And then we went from the other side. It travels in this direction in the cold central walker. So here we have a smell. Snails, we do. Snails will do. We do. And, uh, new spark is called. That C critical angle in this part is here to see again in this part. Is there to see this part is also that tray to see critical angle for water and air interface there to see he's equal to sign in. Warsaw fell in to divide by and one or where, and one is greater than in two. But in one here we have is 1.33 and to physical one. Then we can write a critical angle will be signing worse off one divided by 1.33 This gives as a critical angle off 48 foreign six degrees. Um, was all the raisin refracting within will be that, uh, less than the angle off critical angle and well, who will be observed observed, And it will look like a corn in the life that we mentioned in the fever from the figure than we can right this whole angle, which we call it a theta. This will be a two times so that there will be two times, two times a critical angle. We already found critical angle for the 8.6, and this will be 97.2 degrees.

Wesleyan University
Top Physics 103 Educators
Elyse G.

Cornell University

Christina K.

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Marshall S.

University of Washington

Farnaz M.

Other Schools