Ask your homework questions to teachers and professors, meet other students, and be entered to win $600 or an Xbox Series X 🎉Join our Discord!

Like

Report

Numerade Educator

Like

Report

Problem 48 Hard Difficulty

An x - ray technician works 5 days per week, 50 weeks per year. Assume the technician takes an average of eight x - rays per day and receives a dose of 5.0 rem/yr as a result. (a) Estimate the dose in rem per x - ray taken. (b) How does this result compare with the amount of low - level background radiation the technician is exposed to?

Answer

a. 2.5 \times 10^{-3} \mathrm{rem} / \mathrm{x} \text { -ray }
b. 38
c.

Discussion

You must be signed in to discuss.
MB

Michael B.

June 1, 2020

A 200-rad dose of radiation is administered to a patient in an effort to combat a cancerous growth. Assuming all the energy deposited is absorbed by the growth, a) calculate the amount of energy per unit mass. b) Assuming the growth has a mass of 0.25kg a

Top Physics 103 Educators
Christina K.

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Andy C.

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

LB
Liev B.

Numerade Educator

Zachary M.

Hope College

Video Transcript

for number 48 were told that a X ray technician receives five ramp for year and they were told that they do about eight X rays per day. They work 50 weeks a year and they work five days a week. And we want to know how many RAM they get per x ray. So we just need to figure how many X rays to do in a year. So we're told this. We're told they do here X rays per day. I'm just going to look a unit conversion here. Um, I know they work five days per week and when I know they were 50 weeks per year, so they cancel wheat cancels and I'm left in X rays per year. So just multiply here and I get that they're doing 2000 X rays. Three year. And if they were getting receiving five Ram, I would just take my 2000. But my five I mean divided by 2000 may do it five to vote but 2000 and I get that each x ray be 0.0 25 room. So it's 0.254 m for each X ray in part B. They want to know how this person compares to background radiation. Background radiation is only that 0.13 room per year. And if this guy's getting room five room for a year until it's a lot, a lot more, I could, uh, I believe I have much more. So if I take the five divided by the 50.13 you can tell this turns out to be about 38 times. I divide that I got 38. He's getting out 38 times more than normal background radiation.

University of Virginia
Top Physics 103 Educators
Christina K.

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Andy C.

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

LB
Liev B.

Numerade Educator

Zachary M.

Hope College