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Problem 10 Medium Difficulty

Determine whether each situation would produce a random sample. Write yes or no and explain your answer.
asking every twentieth person on a list of registered voters to determine which political candidate is favored

Answer

No, this will not have a random sample
Reason: One could not predict the favorite political candidate by asking every twentieth person of the list of registered voters.

Discussion

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Top Algebra Educators
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Grace H.

Numerade Educator

Anna Marie V.

Campbell University

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Maria G.

Numerade Educator

Michael J.

Idaho State University

Video Transcript

So when we're being asked to determine whether this situation would produce a random sample, I think there's two main questions that we need to answer, which is how are we picking people for the study or survey, And then what is this? Study or survey is supposed to be representing water. When we picked this group of people and we serving them, what are they supposed to represent? If we think that the group of people that we have picked for this survey would represent whatever this study is supposed to be about, then yes, we consider it a random sample because we would say that everyone in that sample had an equal chance in a borough in the study. Had an equal chance game picked right, eso. In this case, it looks like how we're picking people is we're, uh, asking every 20th person can't right all of a sudden, every 20th person, uh, let's see, says on a list of registered voters, 20th person from a list of registered voters. Okay, so that's how we're getting our subjects. That's how we're getting our people for this from the question is, what is this? Study is supposed to represent, figure out that sort of thing. Well, in this case, it's supposed to be determining which political candidate is favored which political candidate is favored. So if we take a look at that and we think about this, okay, if we're asking every 20th person from list that is random in the sense that we're just asking at a fixed interval or ads every 20th person, we're not checking on anything, we're just asking that. So that does make that random. But we have to remember when we specifically talked about getting a random sample. It doesn't just mean that we're talking about finding people at random. It has to be based off what we're trying to figure out in this case. What we're trying to figure out is which political candidate is favored? Well, when you consider that, then no, this doesn't make sense, because when you want to talk about political candidates being favored, as you guys know, there's many different political views, right? Different different people have different political views. Eso you've got, you know, different parties, you know, um could be Democrat Republican, you know, could be libertarian. Could be, you know, could be Communist you know, it could could be any party that you have certain views with. And so if we're just asking every 20th person from a list of registered voters, for all we know, we could be asking Onley Democrats, right? We could have every 20 person could just happen to be only democrats. We would want to make sure that we have asked people from all different parties. You'd also want to make sure that you've asked people from different ethnicities, different backgrounds, you know? Where were you born? You know, that sort of thing. So in this case, no, this does not represent a random sample simply because while we are asking people at random, we're not making sure it really represents everybody that could vote because there are tons of different registered voters.

University of Central Missouri
Top Algebra Educators
GH
Grace H.

Numerade Educator

Anna Marie V.

Campbell University

MG
Maria G.

Numerade Educator

Michael J.

Idaho State University