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Problem 124 Medium Difficulty

When 4.01 $\mathrm{g}$ of mercury is strongly heated in air, the resulting oxide weighs 4.33 g. Calculate the empirical formula of the oxide.

Answer

$\stackrel{[\mathrm{HgO}}{\mathrm{HgO}}$

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Lizabeth T.

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Nadia L.

Rice University

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University of Maryland - University College

Morgan S.

University of Kentucky

Video Transcript

a little visual, but, I mean here. So pretend this is some form of about syllable black, and we have here some look with mercury create at room temperature is a liquid, the liquid metal, and we're heating it and the presence of oxygen. So we have this little to being that enters in your chest tube, and it's giving us a oxygen. So we're going to form a mercury oxide. But we must find the empirical formula of the mercury oxide. So what have you Bean given? We know that, um, Mercuri reacting with some oxygen to make some no mercury upset. And we know that this final product weighs 4.33 grams, and we know that we started off with 4.1 Gramps of look with nitrogen. So then how much oxygen did we, um, we asked with So we could just simply subtract this quantity from our total mass. Just give us a 0.32 grams of oxygen. So this is under the assumption that we have 100% yields. Okay, Right. So now that we know the mass, we want to know how much of each Adam is present in the formula of the final product. So to do that to know, understand that issue. We can't use maths that we missed you most. And moles are equivalent to mass divided by mullah moments. Right? So we can look on our product tables for more mass in each of these elements and then just simply make this division and what we end up with is 0.0 199 moles of mercury and 0.0 two moles off. Great. So now we Yeah, and this is your 0.199999 for a while. So now, um, we just need to turn these moles and two integer values that we can plug into empirical formula. But we just by looking at this the hipness, it's safe for us to assume that these two numbers are more or less equivalent. So these air curved equation care where in equation is the curved evasion symbol, saying it's approximately quibble. So meaning that they're in a 1 to 1 ratio, more or less men. We just have hte g o for empirical formula. Yep,

McMaster University
Top Chemistry 101 Educators
Lizabeth T.

Numerade Educator

Nadia L.

Rice University

Allea C.

University of Maryland - University College

Morgan S.

University of Kentucky