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Problem 29 Easy Difficulty

Write the Lewis structure for each molecule.
$\begin{array}{ll}{\text { a. } S F_{2}} & {\text { b. } \operatorname{SiH}_{4}} \\ {\text { c. HCOOH (both O bonded to } C )} & {\text { d. } C H_{3} S H(C \text { and } S \text { central) }}\end{array}$

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Top Chemistry 101 Educators
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Theodore D.

Carleton College

Stephanie C.

University of Central Florida

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Jacquelin H.

Brown University

Jake R.

University of Toronto

Video Transcript

{'transcript': "this question were asked to draw Lewis structures for a series of molecules. It's helpful to have your periodic table handy so that you know how many valence electrons, each of these atoms and molecules as SF to sulfur with its six valence electrons typically tends to form through bonds. Florian is a halogen tends to form a single bond. Um, because esque is written first and I have only one of those. I'm gonna write SS Central Adam with two surrounding Florence, connect them with one bond, and I should have a total of, um six bounce electrons for sulfur, seven times to 14 electrons for flooring so I can go around adding electrons. So far, I have four electrons in the structure in the bonds. So glad to have 2468 10 12 14 16 18 20. And that adds up to the 20 valence electrons that I started with. A few check each each. Adam has a formal charge of zero. This is a really good structure. Next we have, uh, silicon, um hydride. Or 200 uh, still intends to form four bonds. I write him a CZ. The central Adam, surrounded by the forehead Regions recall that each hydrogen has a single valence electron and requires only a duet. So once headed and makes a single bond to anybody, Um, that's hydrogen is satisfied. So this is my structure for silicon. If you check silicon started with four Valence electrons total. I had four balance electrons coming from the hydrogen sze. So if I count it my bonds, I have 123 four bonds, each with two electrons. So that's eight bills. Electrons total. All my electrons are accounted for, and each Adam has its complete duet or octet as necessary. This question is a little, um, more challenging because there's no clear central Adam here. Um, so it's hard to the side where to start. The good news is you get a little hint that says to start with that both oxygen's air connected to the central carbon, so that's a good place to start. We already have this hint. Um, it also helps to realize that because hydrogen only makes one bond, it's pretty much never gonna be the central Adam. So we're gonna have carbon in the center. Um, we know that it's connected at least to the oxygen's and now I have to figure out what to do with everybody else. So let's figure out how many avail it's electrons were working with this first hydrogen is gonna give me wanna Vaillant Solectron. The carbon is gonna give me four. Each oxygen is gonna have six valence electrons in that last hydrogen gives me one electron. So total I'm working with, um something 18 electrons. So to make sure that all of those are accounted for, um, the way that these air, um, the structures were written Notice how we have a tch c o h. That is the way we write. These formulas often gives the Santas to who is connected to which Adams connected to which. And so that's Akhund, that one of the hydra agents is connected to the carbon while another hydrogen is connected to the other oxygen. So let's count of how many villains electrons we've used so far, we have 2468 I know that this oxygen on the right already made its two typical bonds. So I'm gonna add two more elections here. Um, now I'm up to 10 electrons total Any to account for eight more if I put 123456 Let's see what we've got. So far, we've got 2468 10 12 14 16 18. Notice that I've used all of my electrons. All of the electrons that I had available are drawn on the structure, but this central carbon atom doesn't have the full octet that it needs. So the way I'm gonna get around that is I'm going to remove to the electrons from this oxygen and share them between that oxygen on the carbon. So what I end up with is a double bond to the top oxygen single bound to this auction on the right and then connect the hydrogen. It's so now, if you look at the structure, carbon has eight valence electrons because it makes the four bonds that it typically makes. And each oxygen is making to bonds, which again is typical for oxygen because it starts with a pen. Six billion electrons. Lastly, we have ch three as h sorry. I wrote this wrong shouldn't be hydrogen. That should be sulfur. Um, again, Notice that recall that, um, the way we write these formulas often gives you a hint as to what is connected to what? So whenever you see CH three, you should think there's a central carbon and there's three hydrants around it. That's that's pretty common. Okay, It also tells us that the sulfur ions sulfur atom is central. So I'm gonna connect the sulfur to the carbon again because hydrogen could only make one bond. It's pretty much never gonna be central. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna use the fourth bond that usually comes from carbon connected to sulfur. Recall that sulfur, with its six valence electrons, tends to form to bonds, which makes sense that it is connected to at last hydrogen. So all I'm missing his to add up my electrons. Um, the first from carbon. I got four electrons from the four hydrogen Sze. I got another four electrons from the one sulfur. I have six electrons so total I should have 14 electrons in the structure. Um, look at the bonds. We have 10 electrons already. I need two more, and sulfur does not have a satisfied uptight yet. So when I add them in, you see that each hydrant makes a single bond. Sulfur makes to bonds as it's typical to it. Carbon makes four. Bond says it's normal to it. And if you look at the formula, the structure actually resembles the formula. We've got CH three here and ch three in the formula, followed by this S H S H. So that formula really gives you answers to how you should be drawing these, and there's your new a structure."}

Rice University
Top Chemistry 101 Educators
TD
Theodore D.

Carleton College

Stephanie C.

University of Central Florida

JH
Jacquelin H.

Brown University

Jake R.

University of Toronto